Search

Trail Pace

Month

September 2015

The largest and most mystical River on the northeastern coast is the Salybia River. It source flows from one of the most remote areas of the Northern Range an area referred to as Mars. It exits into the sea at the popular bathing spot known as Salybia or Saline Bay. The famous Rio Seco River with its vast volume of water that comes from the falls is a small tributary of the larger Salybia River. Approximately 1.5 km before it reaches the sea, there is a confluence of the Rio Seco and the Salybia. This area is a lovely spot to refresh oneself, and the river is like a eco-rich lagoon.

Since there are few paths to access the river, the Salybia with its beautiful pools and gorges remains unknown and preserved. Further upstream, there is an escarpment where located in its course a series of cascades and basins. There is the belief that the Kalinago Carib Indians had a settlement in the area, and they referred to the forest as “Guaro” and the seacoast as ” Oropouche”. The Amerindian name for Trinidad was “Chaleibe”.

The exploration of the river begins at Pierre Trace in Salybia and the walk to the basins will take thirty minutes. The trail, which leads to the conflux, has gentle inclines and is through some dense Mora Forest. On the return, there is the option to float down the river to the Salybia Bridge or hike back via the same route. Note that lifejackets provided to all participants but if you have one bring it along.

Rating: 3 fair

Hiking time to river 30 minutes

Return: Swimming downstream optional and can take 1 hour

Salybia Basins

The largest and most mystical River on the northeastern coast is the Salybia River. It source flows from one of the most remote areas of the Northern Range an area referred to as Mars. It exits into the sea at the popular bathing spot known as Salybia or Saline Bay. The famous Rio Seco River with its vast volume of water that comes from the falls is a small tributary of the larger Salybia River. Approximately 1.5 km before it reaches the sea, there is a confluence of the Rio Seco and the Salybia. This area is a lovely spot to refresh oneself, and the river is like a eco-rich lagoon.

Since there are few paths to access the river, the Salybia with its beautiful pools and gorges remains unknown and preserved. Further upstream, there is an escarpment where located in its course a series of cascades and basins. There is the belief that the Kalinago Carib Indians had a settlement in the area, and they referred to the forest as “Guaro” and the seacoast as ” Oropouche”. The Amerindian name for Trinidad was “Chaleibe”.

The exploration of the river begins at Pierre Trace in Salybia and the walk to the basins will take thirty minutes. The trail, which leads to the conflux, has gentle inclines and is through some dense Mora Forest. On the return, there is the option to float down the river to the Salybia Bridge or hike back via the same route. Note that lifejackets provided to all participants but if you have one bring it along.

On Sunday, 4th October 2015 Island Hikers explore the Salybia Basins.

Assembly 7.00 am Corner of O’meara Road and Churchill Roosevelt Highway Arima. (Next to FT Farfan)

Rating: 3 fair

Hiking time to river 30 minutes

Return: Swimming downstream optional and can take 1 hour

The hike is suitable for Children seven years and up.

Cost $50.00 adults

For details call Mario 749-2956, Marcia 490-2421, Jamal 761-1889 or www islandhikers.com.

Salybia Basins…. Sunday 4th October 2015

aviofwar:

Toco, Trinidad and Tobago

Riding through the Bamboo Cathedral, Tucker Valley, Trinidad

todropscience:

allforoceans:

X

no just turtles, marine litter as balloons also affect a variety of seabirds, read more at 

Balloons Blow

tobagobookings:

Get a bird’s eye view of beautiful Englishman’s Bay, Tobago. Honestly speaking, Tobago is beautiful from any view.

Image Credit: Dillon Ragoonath

Top 6 Things To Do In Trinidad And Tobago

The scrawled filefish (Aluterus scriptus) is a spectacular marine fish found in tropical waters across the globe, including the Indian Ocean, Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean (like this one at Arnos Vale in Tobago). They inhabit coral reefs and rocky ledges throughout their range, where they graze on algae, small crustaceans and other food items.

(Check out the Trinidad and Tobago Field Naturalists’ Club Facebook page for more info on T&T’s natural history) 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑